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Andes Mint Fudge

Andes mint fudge.

This was a simple experiment that turned out quite well. Use your favorite fudge recipe and use Andes mint baking chips in place of the chocolate. For example, my recipe calls for 12 oz of chocolate. The Andes mint baking chips came in a 10 oz bag, so I did those 10 oz plus 2 oz semisweet Nestle chips. Varying the amount of Andes mint chips to chocolate chips or chocolate bits will change the strength of the mint in the fudge. Being a mint lover, the strength from the 10 oz/2 oz mix was very enjoyable.

 

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Butterbeer Fudge

I was recently asked if I would donate some goodies to a fund raising event for a local chapter of The Harry Potter AllianceCavendish Brewing Company was hosting a Yule Ball and was interested in treats for their room of requirement as well as pieces for the auction. I couldn’t resist supporting a good cause and coming up with themed bakes!

The first recipe to share from this experience for butterbeer fudge and is from GetAwayToday.com: https://www.getawaytoday.com/…/butterbeer-fudge-copycat-rec…. A full bucket of butterbeer fudge was up for auction.

The process is very straightforward. When boiling and simmering the sugar mixture, be careful as some of it may jump out of the pot and can burn if it gets on you. Another trick I found to help make the process easier was to have the two separate bowls prepped with the chips or chocolate and extracts before starting the sugar mixture. This way you can just pour the heated mixture in straight from the stove without needing to fumble with anything. The fudge came out very soft and does melt in your mouth.

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Butterbeer fudge
3/4 cup butter (Slice the butter so that it melts quicker)
3/4 cup evaporated milk
1 jar (7 oz) marshmallow creme
2 1/2 cups granulated sugar
1 tsp rum extract
1 tsp butter extract
1 1/2 cups butterscotch chips
3/4 tsp vanilla extract
1/2 cup white chocolate chips

Place a square of parchment paper on the bottom of an 8×8 (or 9×9) inch pan. Coat the pan and paper with cooking spray. Set aside.

Add the butter, evaporated milk, marshmallow creme, and sugar into a saucepan. Use medium heat to bring the ingredients to a nice boil. Stir constantly. Once the mixture starts to boil, set a timer for 7 mins. Stir and simmer for the entire 7 mins. When the timer goes off, remove the pot from the heat. Working quickly, pour 1 cup of the mixture into a bowl. Add the white chocolate chips and vanilla extract. Stir together until smooth. To the rest of the batch, add the butterscotch chips, rum extract, and butter extract. Stir until the ingredients all combine together.

Pour the butterscotch fudge into the prepared pan. Spread evenly.

To keep the layers separate: Place a layer of wax paper on top of the butterscotch fudge layer. This keeps the two layers from combining. Spread the white chocolate fudge onto the top of the wax paper, edge to edge. Once the white layer is smooth and even, flip the entire layer over so the wax paper is on top. Scrape the fudge off the wax paper using a rubber spatula and smooth out any lumps.

To swirl the layers: skip the wax paper step. Pour the white chocolate fudge directly on top of the butterscotch fudge. As you spread the white fudge evenly across the pan, the fudges will start to swirl together. Run a rubber spatula in “s” shapes across the pan from top to bottom. Turn the pan and repeat. Keep swirling until you achieve a look you find pleasing.

Let the fudge set on a counter overnight. The next day, loosen the edges of the fudge from the pan and flip the pan upside down onto a cutting board. Remove the wax paper. Slice the fudge into the desired serving size. Store in an airtight container.

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Butterbeer fudge sliced
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Maple Pecan Fudge

I’ve been on a maple kick lately and fudge has been on my add-to-skills list for a long time. When I came across McCormick Spice’s recipe for maple pecan fudge, I knew this would be the first fudge I tried to make. While the recipe seems relatively simple, I ran into an issue or two that resulted in less of a fudge consistency and more of a maple sugar candy. The good news is that it is insanely delicious and no one has complained about it not being more fudge-like. I have a few notes on things to be mindful of on my next attempt but I plan to duplicate this happy accident in the future, too.
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Maple pecan fudge

1 can (12 oz) evaporated milk
3 cups firmly packed light brown sugar
1 1/4 cups (2 1/2 sticks) butter, cut into chunks
1 cup confectioner’s sugar
1 Tbsp maple extract
1 tsp vanilla extract
1 1/2 cups pecan halves, divided (1 cup and 1/2 cup)

Line an 8” pan with non-stick foil (or regular foil and non-stick spray), allowing the foil to extend over the sides of the pan.

Mix the evaporated milk, Brown sugar, and butter in a large saucepan. Bring to a boil on medium-high heat, stirring consistently. Reduce heat to medium-low; simmer, stirring frequently until mixture reaches 236°F on a candy thermometer (soft ball stage). This will take around 30 mins. (My mixture sat under 220°F for a majority of this time and took longer than 30 mins on med-low heat to reach soft ball stage). Mixture will darken in color as it cooks. Remove from heat.

Gradually beat in confectioner’s sugar with electric mixer on low speed. Increase to medium speed and beat until thickened and smooth. (Be careful not to over-beat. I’m pretty sure I did.) Stir in extracts and 1 cup of pecans. Spread evenly into prepared pan. Top with remaining 1/2 cup of pecans.

Refrigerate at least 1 hour or until firm. Use foil to lift out of pan and onto cutting board. Cut into small squares. Store in refrigerator.